Presenters

Below you will find our ever evolving list of presenters and moderators for our Digital Sandbox conference. Please check back to find the complete list.

Tina Baich is an Assistant Librarian at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis’ University Library where she has been the Metadata Librarian since April 2009. In addition to her metadata duties, Tina is the Interlibrary Loan Librarian, Museum Studies Subject Librarian, and an Original Cataloger. She has lectured on metadata in various IUPUI library science courses and has presented on the topic at conferences. Tina is a graduate of the Indiana University Schools of Library & Information Science and Liberal Arts with master degrees in Library Science and Public History. She is participating in Meta What? The Digital Secrets of the Library Session.

Nancy Brown graduated from IUPUI’s History MA program this past May and will be joining Purdue’s History department to begin thier PhD program in the Fall.  Her academic interests include ethnic and immigration history, the progressive era, and transnational approaches.  Nancy used a plethora of software to write her thesis including Word, Scrivener, EndNote, OneNote, Excel, Lightroom, Photoshop, and Acrobat Pro (OCR). She will be participating in the Digital Tools to Improve Your Research session.

Heather Coates is the Digital Scholarship and Data Management Librarian at the IUPUI University Library. A former research coordinator in clinical and behavioral psychology research, she coordinates data services for the Library. Her interests include data management and curation, research integrity, evidence-based library and information practice, program assessment and evaluation, and the use of network analysis to evaluate scholarly communication processes. Heather is participating in the Meta What? The Digital Secrets of the Library Session.

In his role as geographic information systems project manager at The Polis Center, Jay Colbert uses GIS technology to help organizations visualize and analyze data.  He is currently responsible for all data development on the SAVI community information system (www.savi.org). Jay also makes presentations at conferences and university classrooms on how SAVI can be used for improving community-based decision making.  Jay was also responsible for data development of the Digital Atlas of American Religion which is a website that allows for new and creative ways to map and visualize religion and historical census data.

Kalani Craig is a recent PhD graduate of Indiana University in medieval history, world history and Middle Eastern history. Her research interests include analyzing divine and human interests in Western Europe from 500-1200 CE, Pedagogy, and the digital humanities. Visit Kalani’s website: http://www.kalanicraig.com/. She will be participating in the Putting Yourself Out There Digitally: Using Social Media for your Academic Studies session.

Abby Curtin is a second year public history student at IUPUI. A Northeast Ohio native, she graduated from John Carroll University (Cleveland, Ohio) in 2012 where she studied History and Spanish. Abby’s current research is on interpretation of late 19th-century agricultural practices at James A. Garfield National Historic Site. She is interning at the Indiana Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology at the Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Abby is on the Digital Sandbox Executive Planning Committee and will be moderating the Professional Uses of Social Media session.

Christine Crosby is a second year public history graduate student at IUPUI. After growing up in Michigan, she attended Taylor University in Upland, Indiana where she majored in History. Her current research revolves around the history of the Indianapolis airport. Christine was a members of the Executive Planning Committee for Digital Sandbox and is participating in the Digital Tools to Improve Your Research session.

Jess Frederick is a second year dual degree student in Public History and Library Science. She grew up in Hudsonville, MI, and attended Anderson University, majoring in History and English. Although she does not have to write a thesis, Jess is interested in women’s history, particularly the Indiana Women’s Prison. Jess will be moderating the Nuts and Bolts of Wikipedia Editing session.

Dr. Raymond Haberski is a professor of History at Marion University in Indianapolis and a visiting professor of American Studies at Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis. He is the author of four books, including most recently, God and War: American Civil Religion Since 1945 (Rutgers, 2012).  For the 2008-2009 academic year, Dr. Haberski was the Fulbright Danish Distinguished Chair in American Studies at the Center for the Study of the Americas (CSA) at the Copenhagen Business School and is an associate of IUPUI’s Center for the Study of Religion and American Cultures. He is a founding member of the Society for United States Intellectual History and a regular contributor to the S-USIH awarding-winning blog. Dr. Haberski will be giving our keynote address.

Sharon Kandris is the Director of Community Informatics at The Polis Center, an applied research center at IUPUI.  She directs several large community information systems, including the SAVI Community Information System, and managed the development of the Digital Atlas of American Religion.  She conducts research on the effects of social issues on quality of life, and applies spatial technologies to the analysis of local, state, and national issues.  She routinely helps community-based organizations, nonprofits, and researchers use local data to better understand their communities and improve their decision making.  She holds both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in geography with concentrations in urban planning and GIS.

Callie McCune is a second-year Public History student at IUPUI and the chair of the Digital Sandbox executive planning committee. Callie attended the College of Wooster in Wooster (OH), where she majored in History. Callie is enthralled with culinary history, and as such, her current research centers around the impact of the home economics movement on 20th-century rural Indiana foodways. Callie will be moderating and participating in the Digital Research Tools to Improve Your Research session.

Andrew McGregor is a doctoral student at Purdue University. He is a historian of recent American culture and sports, race, with an interest in public history and digital humanities. He has published book chapters and encyclopedia articles on American Soccer, Arthur Ashe, Native American boxing, and Billy Mills. Andrew is participating in the Putting Yourself Out There Digitally: Using Social Media for your Academic Studies session.

Kristi L. Palmer earned a B.A. in History from Ball State University in 1999 and a Master in Library Science from Indiana University in 2001.  She has worked professionally in the arena of digital collection organization and metadata creation for 12 years supporting the creation of faculty, student, and community-driven digital scholarship and cultural heritage collections.  Palmer’s research interests include open access, scholarly communication, and Indianapolis history, with her publications and presentations on the topics earning her recognition as one of Library Journal’s Movers & Shakers in 2009.  In addition to leading IUPUI University Library Digital Scholarship Team, Palmer also provides collection development and research instruction for the Department of History, and Programs of Women’s Studies and American Studies. Kristi is participating in the Meta What? The Digital Secrets of the Library Session.

Nick Sacco is a second year public history graduate student at IUPUI who is currently working for the National Council on Public History. In the past, he has worked for the National Park Service, the Indiana State House, and as a Teaching Assistant. He will be speaking on various blogging platforms, especially WordPress, and how blogging helps students network with other graduate students and professionals. He will also reflect on how blogging enhances the writing process for those engaged in long-term projects like a master’s thesis. Nick is a member of the Digital Sandbox Executive Planning Committee and will be moderating the Putting Yourself Out There Digitally: Using Social Media for your Academic Studies session, as well as participating in the Digital Research Tools to Improve Your Research session.

Elena Rippel is a second-year public history student at IUPUI.  Originally from Pittsburgh, PA, Elena completed her undergraduate degree in 2010 at Oberlin College, where she studied history, German, and art history. Elena is currently researching how Indianapolis German-Americans represented themselves in early-twentieth-century festivals. She also enjoys playing flute and piano and spending as much time as possible outside. Elena is moderating our session, Keys to Mapping Research, as well as participating in the Digital Research Tools to Improve Your Research.

Tom Streit is the Supreme Commander of Neighborhood Happiness at local arts non-profit Big Car. As the Supreme Commander of Neighborhood Happiness, Tom works directly in communities listening and collaborating with other organizations and individuals to help create happier, healthier, and more vibrant neighborhoods. He has a passion for sharing and encouraging others to share their stories through photography, drawings, poems, and other multimedia approaches. Tom is one of the co-runners of Big Car’s social media platform sharing responsibilities with Jim Walker, executive director, and Anne Laker, Program Director. Tom is  participating in the Professional Uses of Social Media session.

Elizabeth (Lisa) Ungemach is a second year Public History and Library Science dual degree candidate at IUPUI and is currently interning at the Indiana State Supreme Court. She hails from Wayne, New Jersey and received her B.A. in History from Gettysburg College in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania in 2011. She hopes to work as an archivist after graduation and is currently researching 1920s jazz sheet music. Lisa is moderating the Meta What? The Digital Secrets of the Library session.

Kristen Fuhs Wells is the director of communications for Indiana Humanities, a nonprofit that encourages Hoosiers to think, read and talk. Kristen’s responsibilities include brand management, fundraising and development, and strategic communications for the organization, which includes media relations, printed materials, e-newsletters, website, social media and more. Her favorite social media tool is Twitter, where she is an active consumer (and often learns about breaking news!) and producer (trying everyday to make the humanities seem a bit more relevant and approachable). Kristen is participating in the Professional Uses of Social Media session.

As Communications Manager at Indiana Landmarks, Mindi Woolman manages Indiana Landmarks’ digital communications, including website, blogs, e-letters, and social media. Mindi loves the excitement and the “instant gratification” of digital communications. The immediate feedback (and analytics!) lets Landmarks know when it has hit the mark with its messaging, or when it’s falling flat. Social media in particular has allowed Landmarks to reach out to new audiences and start conversations in ways that would have been nearly impossible before. Mindi is participating in the Professional Uses of Social Media session.